An issue that crops up occasionally on two eating-related message boards I post on (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/foodandfeelings, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/group/dietsurvivors) is confusion between fatigue and hunger or desire for food. Maybe you too abuse food when you should be putting up your feet or counting Zs. If you regularly wonder if you’re tired or hungry, you may be missing out on their physical/mental signals or mistaking one signal for another; in fact, you may also have difficulty discerning other…

Read More Yawn…Excuse Me, I’m Tired

I am going to be on the road again soon and wanted to give you some event dates. I would love to meet you in person! April 10th and 11th, 2007 Charlottesville, VA Two FREE Events during the University of Virginia’s Celebrating Every Body Week A Unique Approach to Eating Disorder Treatment for Professionals Includes reception and book signing. Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 7 pm – 8:30 pm Location TBA  This event is geared toward…

Read More Please Visit Me…

A comment on one of my previous blogs raised a good question: Once you know what you’re feeling, what are your options? Unfortunately, there’s no magic or singular way to handle them. Being human is very trying, in part, because of our need to deal with painful emotions. There’s only trial-and-error and some general wisdoms to guide us. Of course, you already know that eating or obsessing about food won’t help you in the long…

Read More What to Do With Feelings

Among people who struggle with under- and overeating, there’s quite a bit of confusion about the word “full.” Is it that blissful instant of eating just enough or does it connote going beyond comfort? More important than the definition is knowing when you’re still in an eating pleasure zone and when you’ve moved on to physical discomfort. Rather than pinpoint one exact moment when you’re full, think of the process on a continuum, going from…

Read More What Does Fullness Mean to You?

I just returned from a trip to New York City! I absolutely love New York. I love the energy and passion within the city. I love the fun! As I walked up and down the streets of New York, I felt a deep gratitude for the freedom I experience in my life today. I am able to hang out in the city without worrying about food or my body. Instead of concentrating on the pretzels…

Read More I Love New York!

What weight should you be and what kind of body should you have? Time- and culture-bound as we are, women especially can’t help but unconsciously model ourselves after the images we see, the bodies we’re told either to have or avoid. From medicine to the media, we’re focused on two extremes: those who are fat or overweight and those who are ultra-thin or gym-sculpted. We notice these folks, rather than average-looking Jills and Joes, because,…

Read More What Should We Look Like?

Every time a client alters how they think about and behave around food, I realize all over again what a difference therapy can make in the life of someone with eating problems. Of course, as a therapist for nearly 30 years, I’m naturally biased. Yet, I don’t believe I’d keep on meeting with clients day after day, year after year, if I didn’t see people transform their lives before my eyes. I know that the…

Read More How Therapy Helps

Hello everyone! I hope you had a good weekend. I remember in the past when weekends frequently meant relapse. My mom would ask me, “Do you know why you seem to relapse on the weekend?” Not anymore. Today I enjoy my weekends — getting outside and spending time with friends. I do not cuddle up with Ed in my apartment alone. With the power of recovery, things can change. It gets better! I included an…

Read More Relapse!?

I thought it important to direct all of you who aspire to be "normal" eaters to Aimee Liu's post on this site of March 14, 2007 entitled "Recovery Is Not A Single Path." It's terrific! Best, Karen www.eatingnormal.com www.squidoo.com/eatnormalnow

Read More Aimee Liu Post 3/14/07

Those of you who have suffered trauma in childhood may find yourself having problems regulating your food intake. Psychology used to lump together all trauma, but now distinguishes between what is called Big T trauma and Small t trauma. The former includes rape, sexual/physical abuse and continual/excessive emotional abuse, severe neglect, living through war, and major catastrophe striking at a young age. Being badly injured in childhood, losing your family, or having to abandon your…

Read More Trauma and Food