Many parents are not emotionally healthy enough to have children but do anyway, which puts their progeny at serious disadvantage. If you are one of those children whose parents were not emotionally mature when they raised you (and may still not be!), you may have low self-esteem because you couldn’t meet your parents’ excessive, irrational needs—and therefore turned to food mindlessly or compulsively for comfort. You may still feel you don’t measure up today and…

Read More When Parents Want More Than Children Can Give

Common wisdom is that some people get fat because they have the “thrifty” gene, which helped our ancient ancestors survive during times of famine. It helped folks metabolize and store food more efficiently so that they were able to keep on keeping on. Now, according to “Ancient genes, modern meals” (Science News, 9/20/14, pages 18-22) come several challenges to this theory which may not help you become a “normal” eater, but hopefully will help you…

Read More Theory Challenged on Why People Get Fat

I’ve always believed that my Yahoo Food and Feelings message board and Facebook “Normal” Eating page help troubled eaters feel better about themselves and improve their relationship with food. Now an article entitled “A burden shared” in the 1/31/15 issue of The Economist (page 72) gives me hope that what I’ve assumed might be true. Although the article is about weight loss, as opposed to becoming a “normal” eater, I’m taking a leap of faith…

Read More Why Online Support Improves Your Relationship with Food

An eating disorder is not just a disease for which we are biologically predisposed. An eating disorder, if left unchecked, can also become a habit. In other words, Ed is habit-forming. And, just like any bad relationship, it can be easy to focus on the little we do have rather than the much we don't have. Ed tries to foster this attitude as much as possible. "Hey", he whispers to us, "remember before you knew…

Read More How to Make Sure Ed Doesn’t Become Habit-Forming

I tend to avoid using the term self-control, never mind blogging about it. It smacks of rigidity, restriction, and holding yourself on a too-tight leash. But, one day I happened upon a review of the book The Marshmallow Test—Mastering Self-Control by Columbia University psychologist Walter Mischel (“Mastering the art of self control,” Science News, 11/15/14, p. 28) and couldn’t help but wonder what it had to say. It’s important to understand where the book’s title…

Read More How to Improve Self-control

Every once in a while, I give over my blog space to a client who has something important to say that I just have to pass on to you—some bits of wisdom on recovery or even a letter written to a parent but never sent. Here’s an account I received from a client I worked with for several years. I hope it helps you in your recovery. I want to share how the work I…

Read More How a Client Became a “Normal” Eater

Ed knows you have these things – the powerhouse trio of knowledge, power, and awareness. Why do you think he never leaves you alone for a second? The more awareness you put into listening to Ed, the less awareness you have to listen to yourself. The more knowledge you put into studying Ed, the less knowledge you have about yourself. The more power you exert to please Ed, the less power you have left to…

Read More Meet the Powerhouse Trio