Do you eat to relieve tension? Maybe you call it by another name—stress, distress, anxiety, feeling antsy. Whatever you call it, the truth is that you don’t need to eat to release tension. By switching your view of it, you can reduce mindless eating. You may feel tension in the construct we call the mind. Your thoughts race, your self-talk stokes the fires of pressure building and building, and your head feels as if it’s…

Read More Releasing Tension to Decrease Mindless Eating

Many dysregulated eaters are filled with fear and anxiety, but don’t register them as major problems. Rather, they think that their problem is food or weight—or stress. If you’re often anxious and worried, it’s time to better understand these emotions. Although “Fears 2015” (Sarasota Herald Tribune, 1/18/15, pp. 4-7) is about our big cultural fears like Ebola, terrorism and, even gluten, author Maura Rhodes advises that that too much fear is something we should be…

Read More Are Your Eating Problems Caused by Fear and Anxiety?

The connection we offer the most time and attention to is the one that will be the strongest. I will say that again. The connection we offer the most time and attention is the one that will be the strongest. If we give most of our day, our mind, our body and our habits to Ed, then guess which connection we are strengthening? If, however, we keep ourselves continually occupied in recovery-focused activities, whether it…

Read More The Connection We Choose Will be the Strongest

If your partner, parent, friend or co-worker is abusive or neglectful, you might be unable to fathom how this person manages to feel okay about his or her behavior. How can people so not get what they’re doing wrong? Can’t they understand that the way they act and the things they say hurt people? How is it possible that they don’t recognize what’s acceptable and appropriate versus what’s unacceptable or inappropriate? It’s entirely possible—because they’re…

Read More Not Everyone Is As Reflective As You Are

I recently received a Facebook message from a friend who’d gotten a copy of my book and set aside a quiet Friday night to read it.  She was writing to tell me that she hadn’t made it through the Dedication page before tears began cascading down her face making it impossible for her to continue reading: To my daughter, Ashley: I would have given anything, including my very life, to have spared you from the…

Read More A Letter From A Daughter’s Heart

Did you know that it’s healthy and necessary for well-being to cry? Although you may say you hate to cry, especially in front of others, that only means you have wrongly developed negative feelings about crying from family and culture. In “No sob story: the good news about crying” (Sarasota Herald-Tribune, page 38E), Mary Carpenter tells us why shedding tears is important. First and foremost, crying relieves stress. Most of you have probably experienced this…

Read More Why It’s Healthy to Cry

What we don't notice might as well not be real. If we want to hang on to our recovery story – our RECOVERY story – we must REMEMBER. We simply must remember. Ed will continually be filling your head with other stories – stories that Ed assures you is true, stories that make you out to be small, powerless, and stuck doing Ed's bidding forever. If you don't like that story, then keep telling the…

Read More Who is the Star of Your Story?

I was listening to an NPR program when the interviewee mentioned that, in order to change his life, her husband would need to see himself in a different way than his mother saw him. I thought how true it is that unless we’re viewed differently than how we see ourselves, we can carry around the same negative view our parents had of us for a lifetime. So, whose eyes do you see yourself through and…

Read More The Importance of Seeing Yourself through Different Eyes